4 Tips For Getting Your Music Heard By The Industry

Despite the variety of sounds they create in the name of art, all musicians are united by a single desire: To be heard.

Today it is both easier and more difficult than ever before to be heard. On the one hand, music is now digital, which makes accessing millions of songs and albums incredibly simple no matter where you happen to be. At the same time, however, there are more artists vying for the attention of music fans and professionals than at any other point in recorded history.

This is the ultimate catch-22 in the streaming age: Music is incredibly easy to access pretty much anywhere around the globe, but influencing people to listen to something they don’t already know is as hard – if not harder – than it was when you had to mail physical promotional copies of new releases to press, labels, etc.

Some artists may take comfort in knowing every other aspiring talent is facing this exact challenge, but if that is not enough to soothe your worried mind we have some advice that may help you get ahead of the competition:

Start by saying hello

You would not believe the number of artists who blindly send links to new/unreleased music to hundreds of industry professionals every single day without as much as an introductory email. These releases, by and large, go unheard. Industry professionals are always looking for the next big thing, but if an artist cannot be bothered to introduce themselves before seeking a deal/exposure then many in the music business take that as a sign the artist may not be that professional after all. People prefer to work with people they know and believe in, so make yourself known and give them a reason to believe in you.

Never attach song files to an email

The average industry influencer receives well over 100 emails a day, and those working specifically in artist discovery tend to receive many more. As a result, inbox space is very limited. The only thing attaching song files to an email will do is guarantee your letter has a one-way ticket to the recipient’s trash can.

Comparisons can be enticing

Artists like to believe they are the only person/group on the planet making the kind of music they create. While that may be true to an extent there are undoubtedly a number of other, more popular artists who sound similar enough that people who enjoy those acts may enjoy what you — the new artist/group — has to offer. By using smart comparisons you make it quicker for industry professionals to understand the type of music you’re creating and whether or not it may be something their audience/customers would be interested in.

Use a promotional distribution platform

There are a number of ways to send music to industry professionals. You can use file-sharing services or streaming platforms, but if you want to present your art in a way customized to reflect who you are as creator then you need a company a promotional distribution service.

Haulix offers a secure way to share streams and downloads of your latest release through email invitations and promotional webpages customized to reflect your talent. Not only will you be sharing your music using a service that is recognized and praised throughout the industry, but you will be doing so in a way that places the focus squarely on your talent. Your promotional page will have no third party ads and minimal Haulix branding. You can add cover art, background images, embedded videos, tour dates, bios, and more – all while ensuring your music is protected from piracy with Haulix’s unique watermarking system.

You can try Haulix for an entire month right now for free. Follow this link and start getting your music in front of the industry’s leading influencers and decisions makers today.

James Shotwell

James Shotwell is the Director of Customer Engagement at Haulix and host of the company's podcast, Inside Music. He is also a public speaker known for promoting careers in the entertainment industry, as well as an entertainment journalist with over a decade of experience. His bylines include Rolling Stone, Alternative Press, Substream Magazine, Nu Sound, and Under The Gun Review, among other popular outlets.